Hyperbole





What is hyperbole?


A Hyperbole is an extravagant statement or figure of speech not intended to be taken literally.
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Examples of hyperboles are:
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  • I am so hungry I could eat a horse.
  • I've told you a million times.
  • You are as tiny as a mouse.
  • This garbage bag weighs a ton.
  • I'm so tired I could sleep forever.
  • He is older than the hills.
  • You are as big as an elephant.

A hyperbole in media is exaggeration for effect or emphasis. It is like the opposite of “understatement.” It is from a Greek word meaning “excess.” If used properly, hyperbole can add an element of fun and comedy to a story. It can also encourage consumers to buy products.
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Role of Visual Hyperbole in advertising





"There is almost no limit to the visual imagery
Total Cereal using visual hyperbole
Total Cereal using visual hyperbole
advertisers can create. Viewers are

growing increasingly accustomed to the provocative,
improbable, and exaggerated images that abound in
advertising." "They generally see past the digital sleight
of hand and recognize that the realistic portrayal of the
fanciful is the result of increasingly sophisticated
computer technology."



"While some exaggerations are clearly intended to deceive
or manipulate unwary consumers, a unique type of
exaggeration may serve alternative functions. Consider
a recent print ad from Tyson Foods that features a woman
paddling a canoe while pulling a man in a para-sail. The ad's
headline reads, "Powered by Tyson," and the body copy
asks, "Have you had your protein today?" Although the image
represents a clear departure from reality, the realistic
rendering of the image creates an intriguing, albeit bizarre
and improbable, scene. Most readers realize that, while
Tyson's Beef Tips in Gravy do provide protein, they will
not make you superhuman. Readers are familiar with this
type of visual exaggeration and will be more inclined to see
humor than deception."
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Examples of visual advertising:








Advertiser
Headline
Visual
Total Cereal
No one packs more nutrition and taste into a box of raisin bran.
A shopping cart is tipped on its front wheels from the weight of the cereal box
Lipton Ice Tea
The natural performance enhancer. Tea can do that.
A women jogger clocks at 65 mph on a roadside radar speed sign.
Chevy Tracker
It thinks big.
A tracker pulling a small boat trailer waits at a loading ramp to pull a large yacht from the water